The 1UP Community’s Thanksgiving Gaming Memories

Author: ally keer  //  Category: Games and Music, NDS

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The 1UP Community’s Thanksgiving Gaming Memories

Our readers share their most treasured stories of Turkey Day gaming.

By: 1UP Staff
November 23, 2011

Everyone’s family and friends do something a little different for Thanksgiving. In celebration of the upcoming Turkey Day we asked our 1up readers to share with us their favorite Thanksgiving gaming memories and traditions. Our entries included epic tournaments, unexpected revelations, cherished childhood memories, and of course family bonding. HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

  • ThePhr3ak

    ThePhr3ak

    Every Thanksgiving, my brother and I would get our whole family together; aunts, uncles, in-laws, stepfamily, and have a bracketed tournament playing a random game. We would draw out on a sheet of butcher paper the individual competitions, all leading to the quarter-final, semi-final, and the notorious final round. We didn’t just play for fun either, cash monies was at stake. To enter each individual was a twenty dollar fee, whether it be a toddler or an octogenarian, with the winner taking home the grand prize of several hundred dollars. I recall in 2006, around forty-plus people gathered around the flatscreen to have an ultimate showdown in Mario Party…

  • daBAMF619

How Japan’s Earthquake Changed its Developers

Author: ally keer  //  Category: Apple, others

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How Japan’s Earthquake Changed its Developers

By: Matt Leone
November 21, 2011

On March 11th, Japan experienced the biggest known natural disaster in the country’s history as a 9.0 magnitude earthquake hit off the coast of Tohoku, leading to subsequent tsunami waves, aftershocks, and nuclear power plant explosions.

In the days following, Namco’s Kazuhiro Harada remembers looking at the data collected from Tekken arcade cabinets linked across Japan, and seeing clusters of locations flatline. In some cases, the buildings housing these machines lost electricity; in others, they fell apart. Back at Namco’s office, his team experienced frequent blackouts, regularly shut off equipment due to power conservation efforts, discovered that their arcade cabinet manufacturing factory collapsed, and saw fellow employees question whether they wanted to continue making “fun” entertainment products.

Super Mario 3D Land NYC Launch Photo Gallery

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Apple, Games and Music, Nintendo

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Super Mario 3D Land NYC Launch Photo Gallery

Nintendo throws a bash in Times Square for the release of Super Mario 3D Land.

By: 1UP Staff
November 14, 2011

Super Mario 3D Land NYC Launch Photo Gallery

Photos courtesy of Anthony Parisi.



Why Gamecock Failed

Author: ally keer  //  Category: Apple, Games and Music, Games and Players, Xbox

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Why Gamecock Failed

By: Evan Shamoon
November 14, 2011

Mike Wilson. Harry Miller, and Rick Stults had done this before.

Wilson came from stints at id Software and Ion Storm, while Miller had served as CEO of Ritual Entertainment, and all three were founders of Gathering of Developers, a.k.a. God Games, publisher of a host of primarily PC titles in the ’90s, ranging from Max Payne and Mafia to Serious Sam and Stronghold. Between them they had amassed an impressive track record, green-lighting and funding eight original PC games that sold over a million units each, in the span of two years. In 2000, God Games sold to Take-Two for $30 million in stock, and subsequently folded into the 2K Games label.

Why Every Elder Scrolls Game is the Best and Worst in the Series

Author: ally keer  //  Category: Apple, Games and Music, Games and Players, PS3, others

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Why Every Elder Scrolls Game is the Best and Worst in the Series

Witness the history of the franchise’s successes and failures.

By: Ryan Winterhalter
November 11, 2011

Skyrim! That’s seemingly all anyone in the 1UP offices talks about these days. While I’m excited as anyone about the newest Elder Scrolls game, I have a feeling that when the dust settles, fans will look upon the game the same way they do every other game in the series. Some will proclaim it the greatest game the series has ever seen, and others will see it as the worst. How do I know this will happen? Because that’s what happened to the last four Elder Scrolls games.

Arena

Why it’s the best:

The Historical Inaccuracies of Assassin’s Creed

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Games and Music, Xbox

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The Historical Inaccuracies of Assassin’s Creed

Four reasons you might not want to cite the Assassin’s series in your next term paper.

By: Scott Sharkey
November 9, 2011

Assassin’s Creed has a knack for weaving scientific and historical facts in and out of a fantastical tale of ancient conspiracies and hilarious ultra-violence. Meanwhile, for all the time we spend marveling at accurately presented old world architecture and associated historical factoids, we spend almost as much time twitching one eye at ludicrous oversights and inaccuracy. Sure, it’s a rollicking James Bond-esque tale where reality sometimes takes a back seat to spectacle and action. We’re prepared to accept stuff like ol’ Leo DaVinci’s prototype parachute actually accomplishing anything besides turning your assassin ass into piazza pizza, but sometimes the game goes beyond Hudson Hawk levels of crazy and takes our suspension of disbelief out behind the barn and shoots it in the back of the head with an unerringly accurate 16th century automatic handgun.

Unerringly Accurate 16th Century Automatic Handguns

The Historical Inaccuracies of Assassin’s Creed

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Games and Music, Games and Players, Xbox

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The Historical Inaccuracies of Assassin’s Creed

Four reasons you might not want to cite the Assassin’s series in your next term paper.

By: Scott Sharkey
November 9, 2011

Assassin’s Creed has a knack for weaving scientific and historical facts in and out of a fantastical tale of ancient conspiracies and hilarious ultra-violence. Meanwhile, for all the time we spend marveling at accurately presented old world architecture and associated historical factoids, we spend almost as much time twitching one eye at ludicrous oversights and inaccuracy. Sure, it’s a rollicking James Bond-esque tale where reality sometimes takes a back seat to spectacle and action. We’re prepared to accept stuff like ol’ Leo DaVinci’s prototype parachute actually accomplishing anything besides turning your assassin ass into piazza pizza, but sometimes the game goes beyond Hudson Hawk levels of crazy and takes our suspension of disbelief out behind the barn and shoots it in the back of the head with an unerringly accurate 16th century automatic handgun.

Unerringly Accurate 16th Century Automatic Handguns

Super Mario Land Versus Super Mario 3D Land

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Apple, NDS, Nintendo, Wii

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Super Mario Land Versus Super Mario 3D Land

Though it may borrow the branding of a known sub-franchise, 3D Land can’t compare to a specific brand of Nintendo weirdness.

By: Bob Mackey
November 4, 2011

The title “Super Mario 3D Land” might be a bit misleading; sure, the game stars Mario, exists on a platform capable of displaying 3D graphics, and presumably features land of some sort, but this new portable adventure in The Mushroom Kingdom really doesn’t have much in common with the Land-branded titles of the past. 3D Land is still in capable hands, though, with the talented folks of Nintendo EAD Tokyo heading up development — specifically, the uber-talented team behind the Super Mario Galaxy series. Those who’ve demoed the game at trade shows can tell you Mario’s newest portable outing stands as a tightly-designed mashup of his greatest moments over the past 25 years, with some new elements thrown in to take advantage of the hardware.

Despite 3D Land’s apparent quality, one important element implied by its title seems to be missing: the balls-out game-changing weirdness of Nintendo Research & Development 1 — now known as SPD Group No. 1 — the in-house development studio responsible for Super Mario Land, Wario Land, WarioWare, Rhythm Heaven, and many other Nintendo classics. While their games didn’t take an explicitly revolutionary tack from the very beginning, subverting expectations eventually became the studio’s M.O., all thanks to the creative minds of directors like Hiroji Kiyotuke (Super Mario Land 2 and 3), Takehiko Hosokawa (Wario Land 2 and 3), and Hirofumi Matsuoka (Wario Land 4 and the original WarioWare.

Saving the System: Where Failed Consoles Went Wrong Instead of Right

Author: ally keer  //  Category: Games and Music, NDS

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Saving the System: Where Failed Consoles Went Wrong Instead of Right

Thanks to the power of hindsight, find out what could have rescued doomed hardware from retail death.

By: Todd Ciolek
November 4, 2011

Consoles only get one chance in the game industry, and that chance isn’t always a good one. Theirs is a crowded playing field where third place is last place and there’s no mercy for the unsuccessful. It’s tempting to wonder just how some failed systems could’ve done better, especially in the turbulent 1990s. What follows is a look at just how three consoles might have survived if they’d been marketed, funded, and supported better.

To keep this little exercise from descending into an embarrassing stretch of game-system fan fiction, we’re not going to change the systems themselves and redesign them into things they never were. Instead, we’ll consider how they could’ve fared with different approaches in the North American market — and then we’ll remind everyone of the depressing reality that took hold.

Top 5 Video Game Non-troversies

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Games and Players

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Top 5 Video Game Non-troversies

Remember these blow-ups that blew over?

By: Steve Watts
November 2, 2011

Dip a toe into any comments section or message board and you’ll find the countless faceless hordes of the Internet levying their complaints and passionate arguments about the controversies of the day. This is simply how the Internet works — outrage is the web’s number one export. To a certain extent, it’s healthy to vent about whatever’s gotten under your skin. But inevitably, we sometimes get our proverbial underpants in a twist over relatively unimportant things; we jump to conclusions, misunderstand, or just overestimate the importance of a given problem. Of course, video games aren’t exempt from this phenomenon; in fact, some of our greatest e-wars were fought over gaming controversies that fizzled out so fast, it’s hard to remember why they had any fizz at all.