APPLE’S BEATS BUY JOINS TECH AND STREET-WISE STYLE

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Apple

NEW YORK (Entertainment Magazine) — Beats Electronics’ colorful, oversized headphones serve as a fashion accessory to cool kids riding the New York City subway, but as tech companies such as Apple, Samsung and others are discovering, wearable gadgets like smartwatches and Google Glass still have a long way to go to become trendy, must-have consumer items.

Apple’s $3 billion purchase of Beats Electronics, by far the company’s largest acquisition, is at least in part recognition that Beats founders Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine might be able to help Apple incorporate more style and flair into its premium technology gadgets —especially a coming wave of wearable devices.

Technology companies see wearables as an important area of growth beyond smartphones and tablets, and many are slowly realizing that if they expect people to wear gadgets —be they bracelets to monitor fitness activity, smartwatches to substitute smartphones or Internet-connected goggles— those devices must focus as much on form as function.

So far, the most noteworthy wearables have hardly been stylish. The standard Google Glass product looks more like something out of Star Trek than a fashion accessory. Fitness bands meant to be worn 24 hours a day are difficult to match with evening gowns or even a suit and tie.

“I guess they are accessories, but I would not say they are high fashion,” says Alison Minton, a blogger who writes about accessories, jewelry and handbags on accessorygeneration.com. “There’s a ways to go before they could be considered high fashion in the way Chanel would be, or Prada.”

To change that, tech companies are beginning to attract top talent from the world of fashion. Apple’s move comes less than a year after the iPhone and iPad inventor hired Angela Ahrendts, a respected executive who helped mold Burberry into the popular luxury brand it is today. In recent weeks, Google lured fashion and marketing executive Ivy Ross, who’s worked for Calvin Klein, the Gap and Coach, to head its Google Glass unit.

“With your help, I look forward to answering the seemingly simple, but truly audacious questions Glass poses: Can technology be something that frees us up and keeps us in the moment, rather than taking us out of it? Can it help us look up and out at the world around us, and the people who share it with us?” wrote Rossin a Google Plus post.

For Ahrendts, Apple is already a luxury brand. Three years before she was hired at Apple last fall, she signaled her admiration for Apple in an interview with the Wall Street Journal.

“I don’t look at Gucci or Chanel or anyone,” Ahrendts told the newspaper in 2010. “If I look to any company as a model, it’s Apple. They’re a brilliant design company working to create a lifestyle, and that’s the way I see us.”

To be sure, Apple has long been a trendsetter when it comes to producing elegant gadgets. Jony Ive, who designed the iPod, iPhone, iPad and Apple’s newest mobile software system iOS7, still serves as the company’s chief style visionary. But Dr. Dre and Iovine have created wildly popular headphones that young hipsters, celebrities and professional athletes adorn themselves with —even when they’re not listening to music. Dre and Iovine’s input will be highly valued as Apple looks to introduce its next breakthrough device.

The cultural coming-together of geeks and fashionistas is happening slowly, says Michael Londrigan, dean of academic affairs at LIM College, a fashion school in New York City. Apple’s hiring of Ahrendts, he adds, “was really the start of it.”

“Overall, the goal is to marry the function with the fashion, creating a wearable technology that is sort of seamless.”

Indeed, the bulky nature of many wearable gadgets is what stops many people from considering them, says Minton. To her, fitness bands are reminiscent of “gigantic, oversized watches they had when I was a kid.” You know, the ones with the calculator built in.

“It doesn’t look like something an adult would really wear. It’s functional, but when you care about fashion it’s not always about function, it’s more about the look,” she says.

Besides the need for sleek, unobtrusive design that can be worn with a T-shirt as well as with a three-piece suit, wearable technology also faces a material challenge.

“Fitness bands are basically rubber. That’s hard to appeal to fashionistas,” Minton says. “That’s not really a sexy kind of material.”

So what’s going to nudge tech companies further into the fashion world? Minton suggests partnering with well-established fashion houses such as Stella McCartney or, yes, Burberry, on limited edition collections.

“You may not need a fitness band, but if it is in Burberry plaid, you would wear it,” she says. Especially if only 1,000 are made.

Apple TV and OS X Mountain Lion’s AirPlay Mirroring

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Apple

First, I will explain what is the airplay.

AirPlay is a system designed by Apple to stream content between compatible devices. This means that you can listen to the audio from your laptop or desktop computer to AirPlay compatible audio systems and regular sound systems which are complemented by an AirPort network AirPlay. Previously, you were already able to stream music from iTunes using AirPlay. With the release of Mountain Lion, any audio system is fair game. This means that you can now listen to Spotify or YouTube audio to your AirPlay compatible audio systems without having to buy a third party software, like media conversion software.

Pay television has become an important source of comfort in any families. But it has becomes more easily since Apple TV and OS X Mountain Lion’s AirPlay Mirrored.

How To Use It In Mac OS X Mountain Lion

  1. Prepare your Mac OS X Lion system. Collect your multimedia contents for sharing or watching on TV.
  2. Mirror your screen by selecting your Apple TV from the drop-down menu of your Mac OS Lion computer.

airplay-mirroring

3. Prepare the Audio System.

Click on the sound icon in your Mac OS X menu bar while holding the option (alt) key, and select the AirPlay device from the drop-drown menu.

There’s always something good on TV for $ 99. Enjoy your digital life easily via airplay.

TUAW Talkcast: Mountain Lion preview show, 10pm ET

Author: ally keer  //  Category: Apple, iPhone

Tonight on the Talkcast, we’re getting ready for the new top cat in town. The calendar is flipping past and the end of July is in sight, which means the release of OS X Mountain Lion is imminent. Our intrepid team has been helping you prepare your Mac for the new operating system via our ongoing Getting Ready for Mountain Lion series — now it’s your chance to call in and discuss, dissect, etcetera.

We’ll be welcoming a few special guests tonight, including Rene Ritchie of iMore and tech journalist Julio Ojeda-Zapata of the St. Paul (MN) Pioneer-Press. Bring your Mountain Lion musings — and also your predictions for Apple’s earnings call later this week.

To participate in the call, you can use the browser-only Talkshoe client, the embedded Facebook app, or download the classic TalkShoe Pro Java client; however, for +5 Interactivity, you should call in. For the web UI, just click the Talkshoe Web button on our profile page at 4 HI/7 PDT/10 pm EDT Sunday. To call in on regular phone or VoIP lines (Viva free weekend minutes!): dial (724) 444-7444 and enter our talkcast ID, 45077 — during the call, you can request to talk by keying in *8.

If you’ve got a headset or microphone handy on your Mac, you can connect via the free X-Lite or other SIP clients — basic instructions are here. Skype users with dial-out credit can call in via the service, or use those free iPhone minutes. Talk to you tonight!

Continue reading TUAW Talkcast: Mountain Lion preview show, 10pm ET

TUAW Talkcast: Mountain Lion preview show, 10pm ET originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Sun, 22 Jul 2012 18:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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30 Years Of Electronic Arts Celebrated In Retro Gamer

Author: ally keer  //  Category: Apple, Games and Players, NDS


Retro Gamer magazine goes back to where it all began for mega-publisher EA.

Retro Gamer celebrates Electronic Arts’ thirtieth anniversary by speaking to founder Trip Hawkins. Trip, along with other key early staff such as Gregory Riker, Randy Breen and Bill Budge, reveal how the company was first formed, and how it turned from a small creative publisher, into one of the industry’s biggest success stories.
 
Controversial games are also a big theme in issue 105. From Grand Theft Auto, to Mortal Kombat and Doom, we reveal some of the biggest gaming controversies of all time, and speak to the developers behind them, including John Romero, Scott Miller and Eugene Jarvis.
 
Other exciting features to look out for include an exclusive making of Tempest with Dave Theurer, what really happened to Ultimate’s Mire Mare, and why the Atari ST was so much more than a poor man’s Amiga.
 
Trip Hawkins speaks to Retro Gamer. you can read the full article in issue 105, on sale now, priced £4.99. Get your copy from all good newsagents, the Imagine Shop, Zinio or iTunes.

Chirp iPhone app introduces sharing via sound

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Apple, NDS, iPhone

You’d be forgiven for thinking this is a story about some sort of jukebox from my House (of Crackpot Theories), but this is news about a real app called Chirp.

What’s Chirp? “Half Bump, half Soundhound.” On your iPhone, you choose an item (photo, note, or link) and then you can share with everyone around you who also has the app. It plays a high pitched series of tones, which other phones nearby (also running Chirp) listen for; the tones convey the URL to the item uploaded, and the other phones download it. (The app does require data access to work, so it’s not true peer-to-peer sharing, but it’s good enough.)

I loaded it today, and since the TUAW staff doesn’t all report to one big office, I was sitting here by myself wondering how to test it. Luckily the Chirp Blog has a couple of test items you can use to try it out, and I have to admit, it’s pretty slick.

Something I hadn’t thought about when I first downloaded the app was doing something with audio on a website or in some other fashion, like an audio QR code. At first that sounded kind of cool, considering all the useful kinds of things to be done with something like that. Then I thought about hearing the same brief tone many many times a day and I think that would get old in a hurry.

As of now it appears to be just the Chirp app that uses this technology, but for a quick way to share files it looks reasonably handy.

hat tip The Next Web

Continue reading Chirp iPhone app introduces sharing via sound

Chirp iPhone app introduces sharing via sound originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Fri, 20 Jul 2012 22:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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How to copy content onto an Android device with a Mac

Author: ally keer  //  Category: Apple, iPhone

Until Apple jumps in with its hypothetical offering, the Google Nexus 7 may be the best small-sized tablet on the market. With a US$200 starting price tag, some Mac users may be tempted to pick one up just to see what all the fuss is about.

Android devices, though, don’t easily sync to a Mac like the iPad or the iPhone. To help new Android owners manage their device, Macworld has a short, informational video that steps you through the process of transferring items to and from your device. (Hint: you use the Android File transfer app.)

You can check out the video by Christopher Breen on Macworld’s website.

Continue reading How to copy content onto an Android device with a Mac

How to copy content onto an Android device with a Mac originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Fri, 20 Jul 2012 10:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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How to copy content onto an Android device with a Mac

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Apple, iPhone

Until Apple jumps in with its hypothetical offering, the Google Nexus 7 may be the best small-sized tablet on the market. With a US$200 starting price tag, some Mac users may be tempted to pick one up just to see what all the fuss is about.

Android devices, though, don’t easily sync to a Mac like the iPad or the iPhone. To help new Android owners manage their device, Macworld has a short, informational video that steps you through the process of transferring items to and from your device. (Hint: you use the Android File transfer app.)

You can check out the video by Christopher Breen on Macworld’s website.

Continue reading How to copy content onto an Android device with a Mac

How to copy content onto an Android device with a Mac originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Fri, 20 Jul 2012 10:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Trapit for iPad is a unique news discovery app

Author: ally keer  //  Category: Apple, iPhone

I have found several news apps I really like over the last couple of years, like Zite, Flipboard and Pulse News. Still, there’s always room for something new, and Trapit is different and useful. Trapit for iPad was born out of an artificial intelligence project completed by DARPA and SRI, and has some of the same DNA as Siri.

You sign up for a free subscription, and start selecting some topics you are interested in. By having an account you can also sign in from a web browser. Unlike Zite, subjects are completely open. You can type anything and get hits from the more than 100,00 sources that are currently available.

Even better, like Zite, the app learns from your selections and fine tunes your topics over time. There are also a great many pre-selected subjects, like the White House race, daytime TV or the British open. You can also share your discoveries to Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest. Email sharing is also supported.

So how does it work? Frankly, I didn’t find the setup particularly intuitive, and I was surprised to find absolutely no detailed help built into the app. The app is not impossible to set up, but I just found it a bit clunky. Topics are in alphabetical order. I’d prefer to arrange them myself. With all the articles available, Trapit has a nice feature that shows brand new items on the right side of the screen so you don’t miss them.

Results were good, both in the pre-selected subjects, and some really obscure topics I created. The search algorithm seems quite sophisticated, and if there are mistakes you can find tune them, and eliminate topics that you no longer want to search for. Mailing articles was flawless. I think the biggest advantage of this app is the freedom of topic selection, and the ability to learn as you seed more and more topics. I wouldn’t replace any of the news discovery apps I have now, but I certainly think Trapit is worth a look, especially for free.

Gallery: Trapit for iPad

Trapit for iPad is a unique news discovery app originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Thu, 19 Jul 2012 14:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Is This What PlayStation 4 Looks Like?

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Apple, Games and Players, NDS, PS3, Sony


PS4 takes one step closer to reality.

The first images of what could be the PlayStation 4 has emerged, as found in the latest issue of Play magazine.

Play commissioned artist Ross Board to design the image based on Sony’s product line and history, technology trends and the likely architecture of the PlayStation 4 itself.

Play believes the PlayStation 4 will have a Blu-Ray drive, in spite of the recent Gaikai deal. The outlet also believes Sony’s next console will feature an internal power source, four USB 3.0 ports, PowerXCell and will continue to use DualShock as its primary input device.

“The next generation will arguably the last that uses physical media,” the magazine writes. “Downloads and streaming means publishers don’t have to worry about second-hand sales, while the continued success of services shows digital is the way forward. Problem? UK’s broadband infrastructure is poor.”

The latest issue of Play is available now from newsagents, iTunes, Imagine Shop and greatdigitalmags.com.

Daily iPhone App: Over: text+ photos lets you annotate your photos with ease

Author: Arthur Ricky  //  Category: Apple, iPhone

If you’re looking for an easy way to add text to your photos, then you should check out Over: text+ photos. The lightweight photo editor only does text overlays, but it does so with style and ease.

Over uses a dial as its menu, which is a nice change from the traditional button-driven interface. It includes 19 fonts, and you can buy more via an in-app purchase. Besides changing the font type, you can also adjust the size and alignment of the text. If you want to change the text, just tap on it. The text box will re-open and let you make changes.

The only drawback I found is the text color, which is limited to shades of grey, white and black. These colors are compatible with most photos, but this limitation might be disappointing for users who like to add a splash of color to their text. This is an easy feature that hopefully will appear in a future version of the app.

Once you’ve tweaked the text to your liking, you can share the annotated image via Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, or email. You can also save it to your camera roll. Interested iOS owners can download the Over: text+ photos app from the iOS App Store for US$1.99.

Daily iPhone App: Over: text+ photos lets you annotate your photos with ease originally appeared on TUAW – The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Tue, 17 Jul 2012 21:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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